We Live On A TARDIS (Seriously)

I was watching some Doctor Who before and I came to a surprising conclusion. We actually live on a TARDIS. TARDIS, of course, stands for Time and Relative Dimension in Space and it’s (if you’re one of the three people that doesn’t know anything about Doctor Who) the ‘ship’ that the good Doctor uses to traverse the universe.

The Tardis. By aussiegall from sydney, Australia (Dr Who Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

It has a few odd qualities about it. For one, it’s ‘dimensionally transcendant’, which means, as the Doctor’s companions almost always point out, it’s bigger on the inside than it looks on the outside. It can travel through time and space and it possesses sentience, of a sort.

So how does the Earth measure up as a TARDIS? Continue reading

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The Rap Guide to Human Nature

I’m an old school rock guy in love with Bowie, Beatles and Queen. A lot of the time that musical heritage discounts rap as a pathetic attempt to talk over a pre-recorded beat (can you feel my bias already?). I’m not entirely in the rap camp, though I do understand the way that the musical discourse of rap countered the racial aspects of musical success (to an extent). I also find many rappers very talented in wordplay.

MC Paul Barman displays a grand example of the intellectual discourse that rap can achieve (and the depths that wordplay for the sake of wordplay can sink to), along with Jurassic 5 (who don’t sink to those depths, as far as I’m aware) and numerous others, but my favourite by far is Baba Brinkman. He has a whole album entitled the Rap Guide to Human Nature (it’s literally free, FREE). And it is fucking brilliant. It’s old(ish) now, but it’s still a genius work of popular culture attempting to integrate itself with the current level of human knowledge. My favourite song from Baba is Performance, Feedback, Revision (though it’s not on the Rap Guide to Human Evolution album).

He has some (what I consider, at least) flaws in his music, especially to do with feminism (although it requires a close listen to pick them out) but overall it’s an awesome attempt to integrate the latest art with the latest science and I couldn’t knock him for the world. Listen and cum.

The Oscar Wilde Trials

Taylor (my rad sister) was recently asking for a book to read, so I sent her off to the Gutenberg Project, more specifically I told her to get Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Grey. No real reason behind it, other than Gutenberg deals with manuscripts that are in the public domain, so it’s a better resource for older classics than it is any modern novels. But then I got interested in who Oscar Wilde was.

Oscar Wilde

I could only hope that I would have such swag if I were born in 1854.

Oscar Wilde was an Irish born writer and poet (born in 1854, died in 1900), most famous for a collection of original pithy sayings (and many more that have been falsely attributed to him) alongside the previously mentioned Picture of Dorian Grey. He was also quite a successful playwright. Later in his life, he was involved in several legal battles and eventually spent some time in prison, which contributed to his later death. Continue reading